CBC Radio Stream URLs

Recently CBC revamped its music streams again and the old URLs don’t work. Why would they do this? Well, they want people to listen using the website or official app, or via platforms they have agreements with, like Google Home and Alexa.

Personally, I think this is bullshit. I like listening to music while on the computer, but I’m not opening a whole-ass modern web browser, on top of whatever else I have open, for a simple audio stream. And if I’m using headphones with my phone or an actual physical radio, how am I supposed to hear sounds on my computer? So, after some helpful tips from more techy folks on Mastodon, I threw together this playlist with all the local CBC Radio 1 and CBC Music streams available at CBC Listen. Details below the fold.

Continue reading CBC Radio Stream URLs

The TRC Report, Online

So I thought I’d share what I’ve been working on on the side: an online version of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report on Canada’s residential schools. The TRC report is a vital resource that weaves together survivors’ testimony and historical records into a thorough, authoritative account of how the government and the churches used residential schools as a means of destroying Indigenous families, languages, and cultures. It’s a part of history many Canadians know very little about. Continue reading The TRC Report, Online

The GTK+ Compose Key…for Windows

So last year I got a netbook with rather poor Linux support. I finally got elementary OS working on it (a blog post in itself), but for the past several months I was using Windows alone. And it was terrible, for many reasons.

  1. It looks like ass.
  2. Mobile and desktop elements are mashed together awkwardly and it just doesn’t work. A desktop user should never see a message telling them to “swipe down” to continue shutdown. Jesus.
  3. Literally every software download site is super dodgy.
  4. The default user is administrator by default??? No wonder people get viruses!
  5. No fucking compose key! Continue reading The GTK+ Compose Key…for Windows

Theme: Markdown for Notepad++

A few months ago I got a new computer that has hardware with little Linux support, and so while waiting for someone to make a sound driver, I’ve been using Windows 10. I tried a lot of text editors, even building Gedit from source, before settling on Notepad++.

Notepad++ has built-in syntax highlighting for a lot of languages, but not Markdown. You can make your own “user-defined language”, and several people have created ones for Markdown, but I wasn’t really satisfied with any of them. So I made my own, which you can check out on Github. Due to the limitations of user-defined languages, some Markdown features can’t be implemented (e. g., asterisks as bullets, three spaces to create code blocks, etc.), but it should be good enough for everyday use. Please try it out, and adapt it for your own use!

How To Install Userscripts

  • Firefox: Install the Greasemonkey extension. After that, clicking the link to the script should prompt you to add it.
  • Chrome: Install the Tampermonkey extension. After that, clicking the link to the script should prompt you to add it. You can also install it without Tampermonkey by saving the script to your computer, going to your extensions page, and dragging and dropping the file into the Chrome window.
  • Midori: Enable the “User Addons” extension. After that, clicking the link to the script should prompt you to add it. More details.
  • Opera: Install the Violent monkey extension or try the instructions here.
  • Internet Explorer: Switch to any of the browsers listed above.
  • Mobile: You’re mostly SOL, but you can try the Tampermonkey app.

The Year In Me

This year I started learning how to use my Wacom! These are a few illustrations that didn’t make it onto the blog.

After the jump, a look back at all the stuff I wrote. Continue reading The Year In Me

Userscript: Byline Strike

Today, Toronto Star reporters left their names off their stories to protest newly hired digital journalists getting paid less than print ones. But, as Steve Ladurantaye notes, the bylines are only missing from the paper version. So I quickly whipped up a script that will remove bylines from the Toronto Star website, too.

Continue reading Userscript: Byline Strike