What I’m Reading, #9-10

9. Gail Carriger, Soulless (2009)

Alexia Tarabotti, a “preternatural” young woman—born without a soul, and thus capable of neutralizing supernatural powers—teams up with a handsome aristocratic werewolf to figure out what’s menacing London’s vampires. Extremely enjoyable, self-aware fluff.

The few annoying aspects:

  1. The totally stereotypical Gay Best Friend™.
  2. The portrayal of Alexia as some kind of social outcast. Don’t tell me she’s undesirable and unattractive, then turn around and show me men falling all over her.
  3. The strains of the world’s tiniest violin at nearly every mention of her Italian heritage. Being an olive-skinned European in fashionable Victorian society is hard, guys.

10. Greg van Eekhout, Norse Code (2009)

A modern-day Valkyrie sets off to make amends for sending an innocent to Helheim instead of Valhalla, and ends up trying to stave off Ragnarok. Decent (and how often do you get to read about a Mexican-American Valkyrie?), but I couldn’t help but feel it would have been a much more interesting book if the story had started a few years earlier. As the lead-up to doomsday, it’s been winter for three years, there’s mass societal unrest, and everyone’s about to realize that the Norse were right all along—great scenario, right? But we don’t get to see any of it, and it’s not really reflected in the main characters’ backstories, either. (I’ve gotten a lot pickier about end-of-the-world stories; blame a steady diet of Slacktivist.)

There’s also a very hasty, shoehorned-in and wholly unconvincing romance, as if someone realized at the last minute that you can’t have an urban fantasy novel with a tough young woman wielding a bad-ass weapon looking over her shoulder at the viewer on the cover without some kind of romantic subplot. It could’ve been improved on with a few cosmetic touches, or alternately it could’ve been taken out entirely with no damage to the actual plot.

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